Site Overlay
The hottest pepper in the world

The world's hottest chili peppers will kill you

The world's hottest chili can instantly seal your airways

If you love extreme heat, chili peppers, and world records, you'll be ecstatic that the new chili is officially eligible to be the newest chili based on Scoville thermal units alone. Mike Smith, a hobby chili grower from North Wales, UK, has unveiled his latest chili plant: the world's hottest chili, a chili pepper so hot it can kill just about anyone who eats it. Now for some spicy food!

Meet the world's hottest peppers

As the Daily Mail reports, Smith's Dragon's Breath chili honours the myth of his native Wales, measuring nearly 2.5 million on the Scoville scale, the intense spiciness of chili peppers and other tongue-stinging foods. A standard measure of spiciness or spiciness. You probably won't find this capsaicin-packed chili in hot sauce anytime soon, though weird things keep happening.

For a small perspective, smoked peppers have a heat intensity rating of about 1,000 to 1,500 (about 30% of a jalapeno). Chili peppers have a spiciness rating of zero on the Scoville Units scale, which is no spiciness at all.

Spicy jalapenos range from 2,500 to 8,000, chiles range from 30,000 to 50,000, and fruity habaneros range from 100,000 to 350,000.

The next chili on the list, the Pepper X or Carolina Reaper — the former Guinness World Record for the world's hottest Chile since 2014 — pales in comparison to its Scoville rating of 2.2 million. Created by Ed Currie of South Carolina, this chili is no joke. It can be grown at home if you like it really spicy.

Heck, the pepper spray used by the U.S. military only tipped at about 2 million.

This makes a Dragon's Breath or Chinese chili pepper with a Scoville value of 2,500,000 a full 1,000 times hotter than a jalapeno - enough to close the airway, burn the throat and cause anaphylactic shock in someone who has eaten it. When it comes to peppers, Smith isn't messing around.

The hottest peppers in the world are Carolina Reaper, Komodo Dragon, Trinidad Moruga Scorpion, Naga Viper, Unlimited, Naga Moric, Butcher Rocky Asiatic (ghost pepper) and Spanish Naga peppers, ranging from 855,000 to a Scoville Heat Unit (SHU) scale of 2.4 million.

For those die-hard chili fanatics who casually munched on habanero peppers and drizzled Carolina Reaper sauce on your tortillas, you have a new fiery monarch to bow down to. Except this time, we really don't recommend you eat it.

The world's hottest chili peppers will kill you, no idea

For those die-hard chili fanatics who casually munched on habanero peppers and drizzled Carolina Reaper sauce on your tortillas, you have a new fiery monarch to bow down to. Except this time, we really don't recommend you eat it.

According to the Daily Mail, Dragon's Breath, now the hottest pepper in the world, scored a hellish 2.48 million on the Scoville scale, surpassing its closest competitor, Carolina. Reaper, the latter with a score of 2.2 million. (For reference, military-grade pepper spray costs a random $2 million.) Grown by breeder Mike Smith in partnership with the University of Nottingham, this devil pepper is 22 times hotter than the now innocent-looking habanero and nearly 300 times hotter than a habanero. . Daily jalapeno.

In fact, dragon's breath has not been consumed by humans because of fears that lethal doses of capsaicin would burn the airways, cause them to close and cause anaphylactic shock. So yes, ingesting one of those tiny rosebuds will actually kill you, even though pepper wasn't originally created to be eaten (no matter how many silly ideas you have in your head right now). According to Smith, Dragon's Breath was developed to treat people allergic to narcotics because chili peppers are really hot and can be used to numb the skin.